Occupation: Girl

Please close the door and switch on the fun without fail.


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Yeah... I hadn't even thought of it that way, only frightening with a female character. That's... somehow even worse. It's so weird to me that this streak of--something--crops up in Whedon's work, because I liked that there were three women (three! three whole actual women!) in the movie who didn't have cleavage hanging out and got to be capable and strong and useful, and he's clearly got SOME feminist themes going for him, and then... always something like THIS.

(People also pointed out that "...he's adopted" also ruined the Thor/Loki brotherhood dynamic for a one-liner.)
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

(People also pointed out that "...he's adopted" also ruined the Thor/Loki brotherhood dynamic for a one-liner.)

True. Hilarious? Yes. In character? Not really.
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

Basically, it seems as though any time Whedon thought he could get a "cool" snarky line in or some funny moment, he threw continuity and character out the window.

Which is a shame.
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

Just for the record, I can't agree that he was only portrayed as frightening with the female character. I just think that is going to vary according to the viewer.

The scene of his that I found the most disturbing -- probably moreso than the BW scene -- was the one where he uses the icky device to rip out the guy's eyeball while the guy is screaming. I have an eyeball squick. I was super happy they didn't show anything too graphic, but they showed just enough to really get me. I thought he was genuinely frightening in that scene. Particularly because the guy was just some innocent bystander, not a hero (like BW) who is presumed to be better equipped to stand up to the villain.

But, that's just me. I've heard comments from people about how Loki's killing of Coulson was the scary thing for them (and no, personally, the leavening of black humor in the scene doesn't negate that for me as a viewer).
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

And and implication that adoption = not a "real" sibling. :/
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

Yeah, this is actually my main problem with Once Upon A Time. The birth mother turns up and it's all BYE, ADOPTIVE MOM, I DON'T LOVE YOU AND I DON'T CARE THAT YOU SPENT TEN YEARS RAISING ME, SHE'S MY REAL MOM AND I LIKE HER BETTER. Which might be fine if it were only coming from the kid, who obviously has a lot of confusion and IS A CHILD, but everyone calls this kid "your son" to the birth mother and saying things like "you're his mother, it's your job to take care of him." Like the fact that the other woman (who, being generally evil aside, has never abused or neglected the kid and seems to love him as far as we can tell, although we don't get a lot of genuine emotion from her) has legal rights to and responsibilities for this child, and changed all his diapers and feeds him and clothes him and stuff doesn't matter at all. Because... only birth families are "real."
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

I have no truck whatsoever with OUaT's grating adoption/REEL FAMILY!! storylines, but Regina tries to convince her child he is insane and needs to be 'fixed' because it would inconvenience her, and she makes multiple deliberate attempts to emotionally destroy him in order to sustain possession of him. Sooooo though that doesn't excuse the behaviour of any other characters besides Emma (who sees it happen) and maybe Mary Margaret, due to her closeness, there's no doubt that Henry needs to get away from Regina.
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

I mean, no, she's horrible. But there are Unfortunate Implications in the way it's set up.

I did love last week when Mary Margaret suddenly started talking sense after Emma tried to run away with Henry. "You don't want people to rely on you, so you took a kid with you? What a reat home for Henry to grow up in." Hee. But then she ruined it by finishing with "You're his mother. It's your job to take care of him," which was effective for making Emma think about what she was doing, but also it isn't her job because she isn't his mother. And no judge in the world would give her custody, even if it were common for judges to reverse adoptions when children were ten.
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

I remember in the first episode when I was like 'okay, props to you Emma for briefly floundering because you didn't want to call yourself his mother' and then for the next twenty episodes going 'seriously, show? Seriously? Emma may, for example, have an explanation for being so vehemently against the foster care system, your narrative does not.'
(Frozen) (Parent) (Thread)

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